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Home Improvements? Your Handyman Can Now Get licensed to do it!

March 31st, 2021|Construction Law, Contracts|

Thousands of Californians lost their homes, in whole or in part, to the wildfires in 2017 and 2018. Many homeowners then began the challenging task of rebuilding. In the wake of this loss and the resulting shortage of available builders, some homeowners turned to handymen for help. Many homeowners came to find out the hard way that these handymen who were acting as their contractors didn’t have the experience needed to complete the work correctly, or in some cases, finish their work at all.

Last year a new bill was introduced […]

Lunch is the most important meal of the day! (at least in the context of employment law)

March 17th, 2021|Business Law, Employment Law|

Kennedy Donohue, a nurse recruiter, was the lead plaintiff in a class action lawsuit filed against AMN Services, LLC.  AMN used a timekeeping system called Team Time which rounded its timekeeping in ten-minute increments. In the lawsuit, Donohue alleged that she was discouraged from taking breaks and had to take short breaks. AMN’s written policies stated that nurse recruiters were paid premium wages for mealtimes when their employee timecards reflected that the employees had not taken a 30-minute meal in compliance with California law.

After a lot of litigation in the […]

HOW TO GET PAID FOR THE WORK YOU DO

March 4th, 2021|Business Law, Construction Law, Contracts, Employment Law|

One of the most important issues for construction companies is to get fully paid for the work they do. Since the advent of COVID-19, we have seen a rise in payment issues to the point that they have become one of the most contested issues of construction claims.

The following are good business practices that maximize your chances of getting paid properly for the work you do.

A) Obviously, Get The Job Done Right!

I am sure right about now some of you are saying, “Duh!!! Of course you have to get the […]

Third Time is a Charm for Gig Companies!

February 17th, 2021|Business Law, Employment Law|

The highest state court in California recently tossed out a constitutional challenge to Proposition 22. Proposition 22 was a voter-approved law permitting ride-share gig companies to classify their drivers as independent contractors.

The lawsuit was filed in January by a group of app-based drivers and one of the nation’s largest labor unions, the Service Employees International Union. The lawsuit claimed that Proposition 22 limited the power of elected officials to govern, in violation of California’s Constitution, by removing the officials’ abilities to grant gig workers the right to organize and provide […]